The App Generation

Dr. Katie Davis’s session today at the Learning and the Brain Conference shared some of the findings and highlights from a book she wrote with Howard Gardner, The App Generation: How Today’s Youth Navigate Identity, Intimacy and ImaginationBecause I misread the schedule, I showed up a bit late to the session, so my notes focus on the last piece of how youth navigate imagination.

Dr. Davis presented research on how student pieces (visual art and creative writing) in a literary/art magazine from the early 1990s and the 2010s reflected creativity. A number of different characteristics of the pieces were coded. A few that I found interesting- In visual arts, more of the early pieces had centralized image focus and were primarily pen and ink. The later pieces were more likely to have stylized cropping and greater use of mixed media. In creative writing, the early pieces contained more fantasy and more non-linear structure; their use of language was more slang/informal. The later pieces contained more formal realism, linear structure, and more formal language. Overall, the findings suggested increased complexity in visual art and less experimentation, greater adherence to the everyday in creative writing.

Dr. Davis noted that while these changes might be reflective of changes in technology, the changes in creative writing could also be the result of an emphasis on standardized testing  might be affecting writing. She also suggested that while the visual art teens were producing appeared more sophisticated it might also be that they were mimicking what they had access to online.

She concluded the talk by describing the difference between app enabling and app dependence and noting that many educational apps encourage app dependence. Students are keenly aware of what we as adults do, and Dr. Davis encouraged educators to model app enabling. I think this is especially important for teachers as they consider how they use technology in the classroom. I’ see a push back on app dependence in an increased interest in encouraging students to explore hacking and the maker movement. 

In response to a question wondering whether apps weren’t just another tool, like a dishwasher or calculator, Dr. Davis suggested that while she was happy to cede much of life’s drugery to apps and technology, she thought it was important to make those concessions mindfully. The questioner them suggested the perhaps what she was arguing was that apps make it too easy to give up too many things.

I thought that last point was an interesting one to ponder. I had my own app awareness moment recently when I realized that I was cropping a picture in a certain way so that it would display well on Instagram. I don’t think there’s necessarily anything wrong with that choice, but it struck be how mindlessly I initially made it.

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